Man of

Rhetoric and Prose

After escaping to freedom, Douglass quickly became a leading speaker, writer, and thinker in the cause of abolition and civil rights. He began publishing his antislavery newspaper, The North Star, in 1847. He kept the publication going with a tremendous investment of his own time, effort, and money, because he insisted that America hear arguments for abolition from blacks themselves. Although white abolitionists like Garrison insisted the paper was unnecessary, Douglass rejoiced that the paper’s success resulted “in the development of my own mental and moral energies, and in the corresponding development of my deeply injured and oppressed people.” (Bondage, p. 306)

Douglass was also the most photographed American of the 19th century, and he believed that photography was connected to the cause of abolition. He gave four lectures on the subject.

After escaping to freedom, Douglass quickly became a leading speaker, writer, and thinker in the cause of abolition and civil rights. He began publishing his antislavery newspaper, The North Star, in 1847. He kept the publication going with a tremendous investment of his own time, effort, and money, because he insisted that America hear arguments for abolition from blacks themselves. Although white abolitionists like Garrison insisted the paper was unnecessary, Douglass rejoiced that the paper’s success resulted “in the development of my own mental and moral energies, and in the corresponding development of my deeply injured and oppressed people.” (Bondage, p. 306)

Douglass was also the most photographed American of the 19th century, and he believed that photography was connected to the cause of abolition. He gave four lectures on the subject.

“This picture-making and picture-appreciating power may be properly set down, if any other is wanted, as another dividing line between the human race and the brute creation. It is a power of great dignity and is closely allied to, if not identical with, the poetic and religious element of man’s nature.”

“This picture-making and picture-appreciating power may be properly set down, if any other is wanted, as another dividing line between the human race and the brute creation. It is a power of great dignity and is closely allied to, if not identical with, the poetic and religious element of man’s nature.”

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